Fashion Time Travel

Taking a (Mary) Quant-um leap through history using a wardrobe as a time machine. Kind of.

 

It's the final day of LONDON FASHION WEEK, with PARIS FASHION WEEK following next Thursday. Beautiful clothing and beautiful people sharing their styles and giving a sneaky glimpse into the new collections influencing the trends next Spring 2017. 

60s Style references always pop-up on the catwalks, here are the originals looking impeccable at Les Arts Decoratifs in FASHION FORWARD.

60s Style references always pop-up on the catwalks, here are the originals looking impeccable at Les Arts Decoratifs in FASHION FORWARD.

I felt the need to share my experience of the gorgeous garments I managed to see on my trip last month to the Capital of Chic.

Gorgeous little black & white sailor suit is Paris perfection!

Gorgeous little black & white sailor suit is Paris perfection!

Les Arts Décoratifs in Paris is one of my favourite Museums and their Summer exhibition Fashion Forward was a real showstopper. Celebrating 300 Years of Fashion, it showcased garments from as early as 1715 all the way through to 2015.

 

The garments were used as a snapshot into life in that time, following a timeline and explaining social aspects as well as snippets about the early evolution of the Fashion Industry.

“Voted “Beauty Queen” by the journal L’Illustration in 1896, Cleo de Merode (1975-1966) was a famous ballet dancer at the prestigious Opera of Paris. Numerous photographic portraits show her wearing a similar jacket in black velvet embroidered with jet pearls.”

“Voted “Beauty Queen” by the journal L’Illustration in 1896, Cleo de Merode (1975-1966) was a famous ballet dancer at the prestigious Opera of Paris. Numerous photographic portraits show her wearing a similar jacket in black velvet embroidered with jet pearls.”

Key moments from fashion history, cherry picked and displayed side-by-side

Key moments from fashion history, cherry picked and displayed side-by-side

 

Theatrical Tableaus gave us a feel for the original setting and lifestyle these people had, whilst modern projections in black and white showed the movement of the clothes flickering across walls with a graceful sweep featuring dancers of the Opéra de Paris.

The highlight for me was the room of breathtaking vintage gowns from my favourite designers, Schiaparelli, Chanel, Fortuny and Vionnet. 

Still at the height of sophisticated elegance, showing that truly well made and thoughtfully designed clothing will stand the test of time.

It makes me ask, what will our own wardrobes look like in a few decades time? Will they still contain anything we have in them today?

Something I'll think of next time I'm browsing for some new items...

The Butterfly Effect

 

 

COLOUR AND VISION & THE NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUM

"Through The Eyes of Nature"

 

The Natural History Museum's new exhibition, "Colour & Vision" features many wonders of nature. To demonstrate how colour is often a warning they use the cinnabar moth as an example:

 

"Orange stripes, red spots and black mouths are all warning signs that an animal is dangerous. Poisonous and venomous animals often warn off potential predators with dramatic colours and markings." Colour and Vision

A display of Cinnabar moths at the Natural History Museum's new exhibition "Colour & Vision"

A display of Cinnabar moths at the Natural History Museum's new exhibition "Colour & Vision"

I first encountered a cinnabar moth when I was on my way to the studio in Manchester a few years ago. The bold black and red patterns of the little winged insect caught my eye so I took a photo of it and looked it up. The patterns are so striking it had a real impression on me. I wanted to try and capture it in a ring, so it really a "Moth Effect" rather than a "Butterfly Effect"!

The patterns of the wings of the Cinnabar Moth inspired this red and black ring

The patterns of the wings of the Cinnabar Moth inspired this red and black ring

Image of Cinnabar Moth courtesy of Charles J. Sharp Photography

Image of Cinnabar Moth courtesy of Charles J. Sharp Photography

 

The larvae of the cinnabar moth eats the leaves of the ragwort plant making themselves and the adult moths they become poisonous. The red colour warns predators not to eat them as doing so could be fatal.

 

Red = DANGER

 

The cinnabar moth is actually named after the bright red mineral cinnabar, which is also poisonous.

A form or mercury sulfide, this mineral is highly toxic.

The mineral Cinnabar, used for making vivid red pigment

The mineral Cinnabar, used for making vivid red pigment

When ground it is used to create the pigment "Vermillion". Treasured for its vivid hue, it is the only red pigment that was known to the ancients. Vermillion was revered by the ancient Romans. They even used it to paint the faces of their victorious commanders during the "Roman Triumph" Ceremony.

Because pure cinnabar was so rare, vermillion became immensely expensive and the price had to be fixed by the Roman government at 70 sesterces per pound - ten times the price of red ochre.

The figure is a lady harpist, painted in vivid pigments by the Ancient Romans and recently found in Arles.

The figure is a lady harpist, painted in vivid pigments by the Ancient Romans and recently found in Arles.

The image above shows a fragment of Ancient Roman Fresco recently unearthed in Southern France, the colours still vivid after spending 2000 years buried in the dark. The use of the expensive red pigment shows how wealthy the inhabitants of the villa were.

You can read more about the history of this red pigment with Windsor & Newton's "Spotlight on Vermillion".

 

"Loop" Ring Exhibition at The Biscuit Factory

Loop is the New Exhibition launched on the 4th March at The Biscuit Factory as part of their Spring Exhibition. Loop is a showcase of spectacular rings by 16 leading contemporary jewellers, and I was thrilled to be a part of it!

LOOP @The Biscuit Factory Newcastle

"From designs that are simple and minimal, to more elaborate statement pieces - the collection will be a stunning range for lovers of rings. Set apart from our usual jewellery collection, the designs will be presented in the gallery as miniature artworks."

Alongside LOOP, The Biscuit Factory’s spring show also includes a diverse collection of contemporary paintings, prints, glass, sculpture and textiles, headlined by 2014 BP Portrait Award second prize winner, Richard Twose.

Gallery Curator, Lauren Baker, comments: “As jewellery curator, I am surrounded by some of the most creative and utterly wonderful jewellery the UK has to offer. While making plans for this year’s exhibitions, the uniting theme for many of the makers I approached was clear - they were all responsible for some exceptional rings; I wanted them all!

This giant Swarovski ring is one of my latest pieces, which is included in the exhibition on until 31st of May 2016

Material Worlds

At the weekend I visited the new Material Worlds wing at Tate Modern.

 

The work on show features artists who utilise all kinds of materials, often in larger scale installations. These included found objects, natural materials, textiles stitched in secret locations and even endless ropes of human hair.

 

Sheela Gowda,  Behold  2009

Sheela Gowda, Behold 2009

Magdalena Abakanowicz,  Embyology   1978–80

Magdalena Abakanowicz, Embyology 1978–80

 

I was most excited to see work by one of my favourite artists, Louise Nevelson, in this new exhibit!

 

Louise Nevelson   " An American Tribute to the British People" 1960–4 Painted wood, 3110 x 4424 x 920 mm  

Louise Nevelson "An American Tribute to the British People" 1960–4 Painted wood, 3110 x 4424 x 920 mm 

 

This piece was gifted by Nevelson in 1965, titled "An American Tribute to the British People", Nevelson's her dealer said that the artist felt that it was appropriate for our monarchial country:

"Its cathedral-like aspect, which seems to present the viewer with an altar at which to kneel, perhaps to receive some royal blessing, and its gilded splendor … were considered peculiarly appropriate.’

Originally born in Czarist Russia, Nevelson lived most of her life in New York, and was heavily influenced by her surroundings. This glorious gold sculpture also reminds me of the iconic cities luxurious sky scrapers.

Art Deco plaque of the Empire State Building, New York.

Art Deco plaque of the Empire State Building, New York.

The display caption tells us that Nevelson worked on this assemblage over a number of years, continually recomposing the found objects within it. Close-up it reminds me of the stacks of old paintings in gilt frames in auctions and junk shops. The golden coating they share emphasises the sense of a treasured item from another time. Covered and gathered they display an inherent value despite being cast away when no longer valued individually.

 

I first found Nevelson's work when I was at school and instantly captivated by her impressive structures. 

 

Growing up in a home where nothing was thrown away, I would scavenge interesting bits of wood from piles of timber and broken furniture in my dad's workshop and in Nevelson's sculptures I could identify the balustrades and chair legs amidst the hand sculpted pieces. 

The way she used a single colour to envelope her carefully assembled finds into these impressive structures had a huge impact on me. Nevelson liked black paint because it conjured "totality, peace and greatness." 

 

Louise Nevelson  Black Wall  1959. Painted wood 2642x2165x648mm

Louise Nevelson Black Wall 1959. Painted wood 2642x2165x648mm

There is such sensitivity in her compositions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

As the New York was redeveloped in the 1950's Nevelson faced eviction from her home and studio. The partially demolished buildings left detritus left from everyday lives, and she found her materials in the debris.

Some of her arrangements like Black Wall,  remind me of the different people living in apartments.

Harking back to the crowded cities like New York I can imagine these wooden boxes as a neighbourhood of personalities housed in different rooms. 

A community is made up of individuals. Living next to each other, but separated by these divides they are shown that they are all one.

If you are one of those inside it you can only see yourself and the four walls around you. Only we can see they are all unified by being able to look at the whole thing from a wider perspective.

 

 

 
 

The new Material Worlds wing is free & on now at Tate Modern.

FASHION TREATS LFW A/W15

London Fashion Week can seem a bit of a chaotic time. From the outside it could look like a lot of fuss over frivolity, peacocks parading for street photographers and avant garde outfits sailing down catwalks in outrageous styles and unnatainable prices. For me the whole point of going to fashion week is just the same as visiting a museum or gallery. It's chance to see the outcomes of everything the designer/artist has most recently been obsessed and in love with. Their fascinations, what they have been dreaming, eating, living, and now created as beautiful things we can wear

But the serious side of fashion means this is a crucial time for designers, their chance to promote and sell their creations to international buyers and gain press coverage for their work be seen and known. As Alexander Fury writes in Issue 1 of this Febs Fashion Daily; "There's one thing that frequently gets overlooked about the fashion business. Namely, it's a business...Hence I aplaud the BFC's new Business Pillar. It emphasises the industrious work behind fashion, which generates billions for the UK economy."

Inspiration "mood boxes" in Topshop's NewGen area of Somerset House

Inspiration "mood boxes" in Topshop's NewGen area of Somerset House

With all this in mind, I'm happy to say that the joy of fashion is still being upheld. The escapism, fun and enjoyment you can gain from what you wear keeps us creative and individual. This is what makes it such a lucrative business. Enough with the mundane, the sensible option, the reality of life. We can have that any-time. Here are some of the designers I saw with the theme of enjoying life and the freedom of wearing your favourite things, evoking a time of innocence, excitement and curiosity. So let's  pour ourselves a bowl of (designer) sugary cereal and enjoy...

 

First up is Sadie Williams. I loved her collab for & Other Stories so it was great to see some of her catwalk pieces up close in their scrumptious textures. Indulge in softly metallic stripes reminiscent of luxurious Tunnock's teacakes and playful shapes assembled on diaphanous fabrics these were sophisticated, wearable versions of collages we might have pritt-sticked and glitter-glued out of sweetie wrappers at playtime.

Sparkling textures from Sadie Williams

Sparkling textures from Sadie Williams

Sadie says her own childhood was hands on and creative, with a DIY  attitude encouraged by a mum who loved textiles. You can tell from the way these pieces seemed free and light, unaware of anything else apart from the enjoyment of colour, shape and texture.

These combinations of woven fabrics and futuristic flashes was like seeing a scrap box of snippets of salvaged fabrics curated with a magpie's eye. It makes sense that her mum also had a bric a brac stall, from these combinations of old and new stating her influences as "early constructivist Rodchenko and folky shapes" and with an auntie like Venetia Scott, Sadie really makes it work to feel fresh and desirable for a fashionable fan-base.

Space Age plants for Sadie William's showroom

Space Age plants for Sadie William's showroom

Walking on a Sugar High! I was addicted to these PEZ shoes- a fantastic idea dreamed up by Camilla Elphick. 

My eye was immediately draw to Kirsty Ward's new collection as I wandered the corridors of Somerset House. Kirsty studied her Womenswear degree in my own old uni city of Manchester before her MA at London's Central Saint Martins. Her latest offerings featured sugary shades with baubles and beads reminiscent of strawberry bon bons and twists of licorice.  "I like to make pieces that the wearer will love, with thought going into every last detail. I also love to mix jewellery with clothing - blurring the line where one stops and the other starts."

 

Kirsty Ward has also collaborated with another favourite of mine- William's Handmade, to make her neat but usefully sized and shaped bags to put the fun into functional with their embellished leather cubes in the same sweet palette.

Here are the rest of William's own bags in her new collection shown at London Fashion Week. These portable pouches, and takeaway totes are an everyday version of the asymmetrical  silhouettes and jukebox inspired steamer trunks from her big luggage pieces I first fell in love with a few years ago.

Casual leanings, these smart bags will always put you at ease wherever you take them.

Casual leanings, these smart bags will always put you at ease wherever you take them.

Williams Handmade, fun, functional and beautifully made in quality materials, bags to fill a niche in your wardrobe.

Williams Handmade, fun, functional and beautifully made in quality materials, bags to fill a niche in your wardrobe.

If Warhol was doing Pop Art in the Thirties...  getting an appetite for Cleo Ferin Mercury's "Diner" scarf.

If Warhol was doing Pop Art in the Thirties...  getting an appetite for Cleo Ferin Mercury's "Diner" scarf.

I would have to combine this scarf from Cleo Ferin and and a pair of Termite shades for the ultimate brunch outfit.

The Factory set might also be wearing some of the amazing shades on offer from TERMITE, mixing materials for fabulous frames in modern shapes with a 6Os sense of psychedelia.

The Factory set might also be wearing some of the amazing shades on offer from TERMITE, mixing materials for fabulous frames in modern shapes with a 6Os sense of psychedelia.

So it looks like there's plenty of fun to come with the next Season's offerings from our designers. Let's enjoy having fun with fashion a little bit of what you fancy and a LOT OF WHAT YOU LOVE!

Society of Island Universes

Society of Island Universes, Produced by Lisa Denyer and Michael Thorp.

Featuring work by Holly Rowan Hesson, Jo McGonigal, Lisa Denyer, Sarah McNulty, Willow Rowlands.

Holly Rowan Hesson  Spark , 2014 Acetate and glass

Holly Rowan Hesson Spark, 2014 Acetate and glass

I was so glad I made it to the preview of this exhibition last night. Produced by Lisa Denyer and Michael Thorp, Lisa was able to give me a mini-tour of the exhibition explaining how the pieces had been installed and how the space had been a big influence on the work.

The artists had use of the space for a couple of weeks beforehand,  so it became more like a residency with much of the work being influenced by being created in, or specifically for the venue. 

Holly Rowan Hesson's  Riot   2014 Projects directly onto the bare grey walls.

Holly Rowan Hesson's Riot  2014 Projects directly onto the bare grey walls.

They used aspects of the architecture to their full advantage. Paintings by Lisa Denyer and Sarah McNulty were perfectly paired with breeze-block walls with left over drill holes and daubed on marks from the raw construction. This was much more interesting than a completely sterile blank space, where any object can hold your attention due to the absence of other stimulus. This made the exhibition feel like one whole installation. 

Lisa Denyer,  Blue Gem,  2014 Acrylic and gloss spray on found plywood 

Lisa Denyer, Blue Gem, 2014 Acrylic and gloss spray on found plywood 

"The exhibition brings together practices which demonstrate a strong interest in materiality, each piece of work provoking the viewer to examine and consider their immediate environment." Society of Island Universes, exhibition information 2014

Sarah McNulty  Right Off , 2014 Gouache on Canvas

Sarah McNulty Right Off, 2014 Gouache on Canvas

I enjoyed seeing this style of abstract show, for this kind of work has a home in this landscape. These artists often work everyday in places like this, creating studios in old industrial spaces as an affordable workspace in a city centre rather than pristine, pre-packaged office spaces advertised to the businessman. Life isn't perfect, art isn't perfect but it's all about interacting with the space around you and seeing it's potential. The exhibition then invites us to find a dynamic between them.

Black acetate part of Jo McGonigal's Painting 1. Piece on wall is Sarah McNulty's Writher (El) 2014

Black acetate part of Jo McGonigal's Painting 1. Piece on wall is Sarah McNulty's Writher (El) 2014

Much of the work here had to form in this space as it is a way the artists has found a way to connect to this environment. Jo McGonigal dramatically drapes black acetate from a giant pipe overhead, showing us the materials properties. Sarah McNulty's Writher breaks down a painting into layers. Appearing to be painted directly on the wall it is an assemblage of printed acetate looming behind taut fabric.  Rather than politely ignoring a structural pillar Holly Rowan Hesson has bound it with scrolls of colour. These rolled photo-prints are so abstracted they appear like chromatography papers, a science experiment literally breaking down a painting into measures of colour.

Holly Rowan Hesson,  Bubbling Under, 2014  Tracing paper, rubber bands

Holly Rowan Hesson, Bubbling Under, 2014 Tracing paper, rubber bands

 

Making up part of Painting I  this piece of carpet was found by the artist Jo McGonigal in a charity shop. Soaked in the stench of tobacco from it's last  home with a heavy smoker, you can really imagine the cumbersome weight  increased by the layers of sickly pink gloss she has coated it with, painted in-situ. 

Jo McGonnigal Painting 1 2014

Jo McGonnigal Painting 1 2014

The sticky looking gloss has helped set it into the slumping form and the fleshy tone also gives the fabric folds a slightly gruesome edge. Nestled nearby is another painted object, Orange and Purple painted stone by Lisa Denyer 2014. 

The pink painted carpet forms part of Jo mcGonigal's painting. Lisa Denyer's  Orange and Purple painted stone  2014 rests discreetly against a pillar. 

The pink painted carpet forms part of Jo mcGonigal's painting. Lisa Denyer's Orange and Purple painted stone 2014 rests discreetly against a pillar. 

As Lisa had remarked on, the display of the objects at a similar height does make them look like they are having a conversation. In this part you can see stone assemblages by Lisa Denyer "chatting to" Willow Rowlands Dog Fruit 2014 watched over by Sarah McNulty's Paint II on the facing wall.

Left to right, a part of Jo McGonigal's  Painting II , Lisa Denyer   Temple  2014 Acrylic and emulsion on re configured cupboard door, Willow Rowlands  Dog Fruit  2014 Plywood and vacuum plastic, Sarah McNulty  Paint II  2014, Guache, fabric, paper. Lisa Denyer  Untitled   2014 Found brick & Omani stone, 

Left to right, a part of Jo McGonigal's Painting II, Lisa Denyer Temple 2014 Acrylic and emulsion on re configured cupboard door, Willow Rowlands Dog Fruit 2014 Plywood and vacuum plastic, Sarah McNulty Paint II 2014, Guache, fabric, paper. Lisa Denyer Untitled  2014 Found brick & Omani stone, 

Jo McGonigal  Painting II  (It is a patch of yellow and a geometric line and hence an idea) 2014 Yellow Chair, cotton, plastic, modelling clay, acetate, tape.

Jo McGonigal Painting II (It is a patch of yellow and a geometric line and hence an idea) 2014 Yellow Chair, cotton, plastic, modelling clay, acetate, tape.

Jo McGonigal Painting II adds tension to the space. An empty chair needs to be resisted to either be moved on its casters or sat upon. Nearby a ball of clay in a co-ordinating colour perches precariously on what appears to once have been a piece of corner skirting board, with a wondrous boomerang shape. 

This kind of work needs a large space like Unit 4 to have an impact and in Society of Island Universes the artists have created their own world. Only on until Sunday, and right by Piccadilly Station, if you get the chance you should really check it out to experience it for yourself!

Society of Island Universes "explores the ideology behind abstraction".

Currently showing at Unit 4C Piccadilly Place, Manchester Thursday 17th July-Sunday 20th July,  1-6pm.

 

Dries Van Noten, Paris Exhibition

Paris is a city that takes fashion seriously. They respect the couture houses which have established themselves over decades, creating or even engulfing a designer's career (go and see Yves Saint Laurent if you haven't already, as indulgently beautiful a film as it could be). Speeding through the tunnel on the Eurostar, the evidence was there before I'd even sipped my Earl Grey, looking at the cover of their Metropolitan magazine.

I may have snaffled a copy because the journey went so quickly I didn't get chance to read it all!

I may have snaffled a copy because the journey went so quickly I didn't get chance to read it all!

On my wish list to see whilst I was in Paris was the Dries Van Noten exhibition at the musée des Arts décoratifs.  Happily I got to spend a good chunk of time there as it really is a feast for the eyes, I felt totally saturated by the colours and rich textures by the time I left.

This is the first exhibition devoted entirely to the Belgian artist's work, shows us his inspirations and processes allowing us to peer into the mind of the designer. As well as the fashion collections the exhibition has sourced some amazing paintings and pieces to demonstrate the broad references the designer draws upon.


There are many paintings by famous fine artists featured alongside the garments giving a sense of the depth of the ideas and a sense of creativity that goes into the collections. The use of portraits was interesting as clothing is such a personal thing. Selecting your most worn/favourite outfit and displaying it on a mannequin in a gallery could be just as personal and revealing (or more so) as with sitting for a portrait.

 

You can see directly how the styles and techniques of the artists have influenced the fashion work and what makes them more than just clothing. The way they were displayed as well is an all encompassing world of colour and patterns that grows over walls, floors and ceilings so with each section you are immersed completely. With this exhibition the aim really does seem to be an experience in Fashion as Art.

I loved the way they used these life-size photographs of Francis Bacon's studio. The paint splattered surroundings bleed into the mannequins associating them with their freedom of expression and creativity.

Happy Museum Week! Whether near or far, go and see something new, old, or a mixture of the two and be inspired!

Galactic Exhibition

One of my necklaces at the exhibition: Pyrite encrusted cube necklace on oxidised silver chain

One of my necklaces at the exhibition: Pyrite encrusted cube necklace on oxidised silver chain

An Exhibition of Jewellery that is Out of this World!

At the Royal Birmingham Society of Artists 

22nd July - 19th October 2013

 

Here's a new pair of earrings in granite and sterling silver

Here's a new pair of earrings in granite and sterling silver

I was so excited to be invited to take part in this exhibition. There will be ceramics, jewellery and glass all by artists inspired by outer space.  Here's a list of those taking part: 

Tracey Birchwood, Annie Cracknell, Jemma Daniels, Christine Davies, Simon Denvers, Samantha Donaldson, Emma Farnworth, Alice Gow, Akiko Hirai, Jade Mellor, Ros Millar, Myung Nam An, Mandana Oskoui, Danny Ries, Charlotte Sale, Alex Shimwell, Emily Thatcher, Perin Towlson, Irena Maria Varey, Charlotte Verity

 

Designs of the Year 2013

Winning Design: it's not always black and white.

 

colby neon poster design museum.JPG

The people's Choice winners have just been announced for the Design Museums "Designs of the Year" (see the Design Museum's full list here). These are some of my favourite colourful nominees from my visit to the exhibition.

 

colby neon poster joy design museum.JPG

 Made in L.A: Work by Colby Poster Printing Company. The contemporary graphics were curated & designed by Anthony Burrill and produced by the family run Colby company, who have continued to use woodblock, silkscreen and letterpress printing methods since 1946. Their pleasing no-frills style and energising colours continue to have an impact.

colby see you yellow poster design museum.JPG

Now how about printing...sounds???!!!

These magical postcards are from Uniform. The prototypes include these cards and a special player. By slotting them into the gadget and squeezing the printed "buttons" the conductive ink controls a play, pause and skip track feature. 

uniform using digital postcard conductive ink design museum.JPG

Imagine combing these last two to create giant posters advertising bands, gigs and festivals where by being able to touch the special ink you could listen to their music!

Here's a link to the BBC website where Peter Thomas from Uniform talks about doing just this, with their "Listening Post" idea.

"There's a really different reaction from users to physical media as opposed to digital media, especially when it comes to music...

we're trying to recapture some of the tactile experience you got with vinyl records." Peter Thomas.

 

This could work brilliantly well for the partially sighted, posters containing spoken information or conveying a message.

Hands on again, but with Colour Porcelain! These exquisite pieces were hand painted by one the oldest Japanese porcelain manufacturers 1616 Arita. The simple modern design uses traditional Japanese colours, such as aquarelle blue, light green, red-orange and yellow ochre. Designed by Scholten & Baijings Colour Porcelain consists of three collections named after their decoration: Minimal, Colourful and Extraordinary. 

arita 1616 colour porcelain.jpg
colour porcelain japan design museum.JPG

In the Design Museum's exhibition the collection was displayed alongside images of the workshops where they were produced to communicate the craftsmanship behind them. I think if a lot of products were accompanied with an image of how they were made and who by it make make people consider where they are spending their money. Similar to cigarette packets showing health consequences, would you still buy that "bargain" with a photo of a sweatshop child peering at you? Or on the other hand would you be more likely to spend a bit more if you saw an established workshop stocked up with the finest quality materials? 

ChildVision_glasses.jpg

WINNER: Child Vision

The winner of the visitor's choice Design Award (voted for by the public) went to Child Vision. These self adjusting glasses have been a great help in developing countries where it can difficult or expensive to receive eye tests and have an individual's prescription lenses made. These liquid filled lenses can be adjusted by the wearer to help them see better and this design is specifically aimed at young adults. What a clever idea, see well AND look good! :)

 

There's more to come on this exhibition, so don't worry if you missed it. Lots more great designs to share coming up...